Characteristics of Particles of Matters

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Definition ofCharacteristics of Particles of Matters

Solids, liquids, gases, plasmas, and one state called the Bose-Einstein condensate are the five states of matter.

More AboutCharacteristics of Particles of Matters

  • Scientists have always known about solids, liquids, and gases
  • Plasma was a new idea when it was noticed by William Crookes in 1879
  • The scientists who worked with the Bose-Einstein condensate received a Nobel Prize for their work in 1995
  • Solids are often hard and brittle. Liquids are all fluidy at room temperature. Gases are there, but you usually smell them before you can see them
  • You don't see them because their molecules are really far apart
  • The BEC is all about molecules that are really close to each other, even closer than atoms in a solid
  • Elements and compounds can move from one physical state to another and not change their basic atomic parts
  • Oxygen ( O2 ) as a gas still has the same properties as liquid oxygen. The liquid state is colder and denser, but the molecules are still the same
  • Water ( H2 O ) is another example. A water molecule is made up of two hydrogen (H) atoms and one oxygen (O) atom.
  • Water has the same molecular structure whether it is a gas, liquid, or solid. Although its physical state may change, its chemical state remains the same
  • The particles of matter are so small that they cannot be seen by naked eye
  • If a few particles of are added to 100ml water, the crystals spread and the colour is seen distributed throughout water
  • 10ml. Water is taken and diluted to 100ml. the colour becomes light but is visible
  • Even on further dilution, the colour is still visible to the eye. This show that even in a few crystals of several millions of molecules are present
  • Particles of one type of matter mix into another type as there is enough space between particles of matter
  • Particles of matter keep moving continuously. The particles of matter possess kinetic energy
  • As the temperature rises, particles move faster. With an increase in temperature, kinetic energy increases
  • Particles of matter intermix on their own with each other. This property is called diffusion
  • On heating particles of matter, diffusion becomes faster
  • Particles of matter have force acting between them. This force keeps the particles together
  • The strength of the force of attraction varies from one particle to another
  • The boiling point of liquid is raised by increasing the pressure and reduced by lowering the pressure. It can be demonstrated by the apparatus shown in figure(second one)

Applications:

  • As the temperature rises, particles move faster. With an increase in temperature, kinetic energy increases
  • Particles of matter intermix on their own with each other. This property is called diffusion
  • On heating particles of matter, diffusion becomes faster
  • Particles of matter have force acting between them. This force keeps the particles together
  • The strength of the force of attraction varies from one particle to another
  • The boiling point of liquid is raised by increasing the pressure and reduced by lowering the pressure. It can be demonstrated by the apparatus shown in figure(second one)